Axbridge Pageant 2022 News: video promo of the August community play in the Somerset town released

Chris Jarman who is the Narrator in the Pageant

A 15 second video has been shot to promote the Axbridge Pageant in Somerset that takes place this August.

The video is at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9zgx_wqXNo

Tickets now available online at https://axbridgepageant.com and at Axbridge Post Office.

AXBRIDGE PAGEANT 2022: SATURDAY-MONDAY, 27-29 AUGUST, 2022

The Axbridge Pageant is a community event that has been performed regularly since 1967 when a celebration of the town’s history was first held in the town square. Since then it has been held in 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000 and 2010. Due to the Covid Crisis it was postponed from 2020 to this summer.

The Axbridge Pageant is set to take place at 3pm daily over the Bank Holiday Weekend, Saturday-Monday, August 27-29. 2022.

Tickets are now on sale. To buy tickets visit: https://axbridgepageant.com/tickets The pageant is entirely funded through community fundraising events throughout the year, ticket sales, programme sales and sponsorship. If you would like to sponsor a scene and/or take an advertisement in the programme visit https://axbridgepageant.com/Sponsor_Axbridge_Pageant

You can also donate to the pageant — especially popular for those who cannot make it to the event this year — via Just Giving. To donate to the pageant at Just Giving visit https://tinyurl.com/2p8dk7j9 If you are interested in being part of the town’s most exciting and creative event either in the cast or behind the scenes, please contact the producer and production manager John Kendall on 01934 732103 or 07770 998731.

For more news, features and photos on the pageant visit http://axbridgepageant.com/

The Axbridge Pageant’s lead sponsor is Enable of Axbridge, promotional and marketing. For details visit https://www.enablepm.com/

BATH VOICE MONTHLY NEWS MAGAZINE: out now to thousands of homes FREE in the city and in some retail outlets

July’s issue has sports news, what’s on, local history and lots of news from Bath including a report on Twinning, Combe Down celebrations, the Gathering on the Green in Bloomfield and the lost gardens of Carrs Wood.

For more on Bath visit http://www.harrymottram.co.uk/bath-voice/bath-news/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/HarryMottram5

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More news of Bath’s chic community in Bath Voice magazine – now out – or read online at https://issuu.com/bathvoice

CHECKACO NEWS: As crypto currencies crash fears are raised that some are in effect Ponzi Schemes as industry is defended on TV by Michael Saylor as he’s challenged by Julia Chatterley

Last November the Bitcoin was on a high as the new crypto currencies appeared to enjoy financial stability suggesting they were a new way to get rich by investing in them.

Eight months later and Bitcoin has halved in value, Celsius Network has frozen withdrawals, TerraUSD is now valueless, while Ethereum one of the big currencies in the field has plunged in value.

Investors in some currencies have potentially lost their entire investment while others have seen what they put in devalue to almost worthless amounts.

The advice from Checkaco has and always will be don’t invest in any scheme unless you can afford to lose everything. Many commentators have likened cryptocurrencies to Ponzi Schemes in that they suck in huge amounts of money only for the bubble to burst. They criticise the advocates of the currencies as the sector is unregulated and is not based on anything tangible like property, oil, gold etc.

Bitcoin is still the largest of the crypto currencies with a crowded market of similar types, number around 19,000 with some worthless and others claiming to be increasing in value. The cause of the collapse in value of many of these currencies has been the bear market in the traditional stock markets triggered in part by the Ukraine war. Those declines though are tiny compared to wild volatility of the virtual ones so the message is if you want stability stick with the tried and tested and indeed regulated.

Michael Saylor, the CEO of MicroStrategy didn’t help matters when challenged this week on CNN by Julia Chatterley by attempting to liken the creation of cryptocurrencies to the invention of the motor car and admitted ‘average investors’ had been taken advantage of. Writing for the Guardian Professor Robert Reich likened the currencies to Ponzi Schemes where the people who start them become rich while the newest investors at the bottom are most likely to lose out.

He said: “Before the crypto crash, the value of cryptocurrencies had kept rising by attracting an ever-growing number of investors and some big Wall Street money, along with celebrity endorsements. But, again, all Ponzi schemes topple eventually. And it looks like crypto is now toppling.”

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Bath Voice Theatre Review: a quartet of female actors punch above their weight in a five star production of Joy Wilkinson’s story of Victorian women boxers at the Mission Theatre

The Sweet Science of Bruising: Anna Lamb spars with Francesca McBride as Violet Hunter

Theatre Review: The Sweet Science of Bruising, The Mission Theatre, Bath

When the boxer Nicola Adams stepped into the ring to fight Ren Cancan for Olympic Gold in 2012 they did so as athletes. No make-up, blow-dried hair or sexy outfits – but simply as the best physical version of themselves in the ultimate female boxing competition. A contest not for the sexual gratification of men but as part of the Olympic Games to be cheered on by boxing enthusiasts around the world.

It has taken decades if not centuries for women in this country to gain equality in law, sports, voting rights, pay and employment – all pioneered from figures such as Mary Wolfstonecraft’s Vindication of the Rights of Women to the Suffragettes and the likes of Billy Jean King beating Bobby Riggs in the ‘battle of the sexes’, tennis match in 1973.

In Joy Wilkinson’s play The Sweet Science of Bruising at the Mission Theatre in Bath we are taken back to the turn of the 19th century in a Victorian England where women were beginning to assert their voices in society. And yet they were still largely controlled by men. Step forward showman Professor Charlie Sharp played with a fabulously theatricality by Bob Constantine who stages boxing matches and other entertainments for money. He stumbles upon Polly Stokes through her brother the boxer Paul Stokes and the idea of a female boxing contest is born. Tianna James as Polly is superb as the aspiring athlete as she spars, jabs and punches with total commitment. In contrast Callum Marshall as her brother convinces as the nearly man – who is overshadowed by his sibling – straight roles are always harder to pull off and he also achieves this again as he doubles as Captain Danby.

Bob Constantine enjoyed himself as the showman Professor Charlie Sharp

Another actor playing it straight is Alistair Davey who doubles up as several characters with the impossibly prejudiced and demanding Doctor Forster as being particularly memorable. And completing the unreconstructed Victorian gents is the husband of Anna Lamb played by Harry Mason whose eventual comeuppance was enthusiastically cheered on by the audience. That suggested he had successfully become a hate figure for his despicable behaviour towards Anna – much better than a standing ovation.

Two supporting female roles were Aunt George played by an on-form Sara Keane and the maid played by the appropriately subservient Antonia White. That leaves the quartet of female boxers who constrained by their corsets and controlled by men finish the drama in a rousing corset less finale. Tiana James as Polly was brilliant, Francesca McBride as Violet Hunter was exceptional – and has the added natural ingredient of a slight catch of emotion in her voice which helps convince with her speeches. Anna Lamb was played by Olivia Stiles who rather enjoyed repaying her husband’s bad behaviour with her fists and Matty was given another exceptional performance by the talented Ellie Turner. A cast of all the talents worthy of any professional stage.

A quartet of women boxers in Victorian England heralded the equality in the next century

Perhaps the most memorable aspect of Joy Wilkinson’s 2018 drama staged in a traverse setting at the Mission Theatre was Brian Hudd’s direction. He managed to combine the genteel discussions with the extreme physicality required to convince the audience of boxing’s innate violence. Hudd had a good team with fight choreographer Nicky Wilkins essential in making the boxing look and sound real. Chayenne Rogers-Dixon’s videography and imagery projected onto the back wall of the stage added much period detail and atmosphere while the set was minimal allowing for the action to be unrestrained. My only thought was that some form of carpet of covering on the boards would have helped to dampen the constant footsteps of the entrances and exits – although a minor point in a production that was a five star triumph for the Next Stage Theatre Company.

All women and girls should see this play or read the original novel as it highlights the inequalities of the past but also heralds the breakthroughs that were to come with Votes for Women and Barbara Castle’s 1970 Equal Pay Act to the day Nicola Adams could step into a boxing ring, not wearing a corset, but as an athlete ready to perform as a professional boxer.

Harry Mottram

The play runs to Saturday 2nd July, nightly at 7.30pm.

Details and tickets at http://www.missiontheatre.co.uk/

Harry Mottram is the news editor of Bath Voice monthly magazine covers news, views, reviews, previews and features as well as what’s on in Bath and events for residents in Bear Flat, Widcombe and Oldfield Park and the wider Bath area. Delivered door to door in south Bath and available in shops and supermarkets. See the Facebook site for details.

More news of Bath’s chic community in Bath Voice magazine – now out – or read online at https://issuu.com/bathvoice

For details for the work of the journalist Harry Mottram visit www.harrymottram.co.uk and follow him on all social media sites.

See:  https://www.facebook.com/bathvoice)
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ICSM Business News: six major firms reported to be targeted by short sellers in a retail trade article – could the unthinkable be about to happen?

By Harry Mottram: The trade publication Retail Gazette has listed six retailers that they say have been the target of short sellers. That inevitably has raised eyebrows in the retailing sector since the high street has gone through fundamental changes since the rise of home shopping, covid and changes in lifestyles.

Short selling is perhaps best described in the 2015 movie The Big Short with Brad Pitt, Ryan Gosling and Christian Bale in which a small group of city traders realise ahead of the 2008 Credit Crunch that the housing and banking markets are about the collapse in the USA. They buy stocks from the banks and lenders and bet against their collapse before the sub-prime mortgage scandal develops. They get paid the difference between the before and after prices by the banks – which is short selling. Short selling is effectively a sign that the traders believe a stock is over priced as that is the way they make their money.

That’s why when the Retail Gazette published the story anyone with a financial interest in the retailers mentioned need to think seriously about its potential implications. It beggars the question: could the unthinkable be about to happen?

Reporter George Iddenden wrote: “According to data from the London Stock Exchange (LSE), Asos, Boohoo, Kingfisher, Royal Mail, AO World and Naked Wines are all being targeted by short sellers and should be wary of further shifts over the coming months.

“Aggressive or excessive stock shorting is widely recognised as a way to undermine investor confidence, depress a company’s market value and make it more difficult for it to expand or raise capital.”

Iddenden explained all of the firms listed had problems – some caused by debt and some from the Covid hangover but all with falls in their market value. Short sellers are taking big risks in shorting with a lot of money and so anyone who has an interest in those firms need to take note.

About ICSM Credit

ICSM Credit has more than four decades of experience as a credit intelligence group whose members gain inside information about firms in trouble allowing them to avoid bad debts and rogue traders. To join costs less than a tank of fuel – while at the moment there’s a special free temporary membership offer during the Covid-19 crisis which gives access to free legal letters. ICSM also has an effective debt collecting service which has a global reach – ask for details from Paul.

For details about ICSM Credit call 0844 854 1850 or visit the website www.icsmcredit.com or email Ian at Ian.carrotte@icsmcredit.com on how to subscribe and to join the UK’s credit intelligence network to avoid bad debts and late payers. Follow ICSM Credit on FaceBook, Twitter and YouTube and Ian Carrotte on LinkedIn.

To keep up to date subscribe to the FREE ICSM Credit Newsletter to hear all the latest insolvency news and to see who has gone out of business click on the orange panel on the top left of the home page of the website www.icsmcredit.com or send an email to Ian.carrotte@icsmcredit.com

For details for the work of the journalist Harry Mottram visit www.harrymottram.co.uk

BATH VOICE FEATURE: Busy and intimidating and full of rude snobs – not the Bath of today but the Bath of Jane Austen’s Catherine Morland

Movie: Felicity Jones as Catherine Morland and JJ Field as Henry Tilney in the 2007 film

By Harry Mottram. One thing hasn’t changed about Bath since the time that Catherine Morland visited the city: ‘shops must be visited and money must be spent.’
Mr Allen’s words are as true now as they were in Jane Austen’s novel Northanger Abbey which is one of the reasons that her novels still ring true – the other being the well observed characters and social conflicts which although of their time are universal and remain contemporary.
Northanger Abbey written in 1803 is not the only novel of Austen’s that features Bath but it gives a vivid description of the busy social scene as seen through the eyes of Catherine.
The coming of age novel is a gentle send up of the fad for Gothic novels of the time in which beautiful heroines are locked away in haunted castles and are rescued from bounders intent on having their wicked way with young women.
Poor Catherine is so wrapped up in the fantasies of Ann Radcliffe’s novel the Mysteries of Udolpho, that she superimposes thoughts of murder and mystery onto General Tilney of Northanger Abbey, convinced he has murdered his wife.
In Bath she is more concerned with the more prosaic problems of gaining a step on the social circle that centred on the Upper Assembly Rooms. Here together with Mrs Allen she squeezes through the throng in the hope of meeting an eligible young man.
Unfortunately she meets the ghastly upwardly mobile Thorpes, and is initially unable to spot a couple of snobs until their true nature is revealed.
Eventually she meets Henry Tilney who is more in tune with the foibles of society and the Thorpes in particular and can spot a phoney at 50 paces. Spoiler alert, he inevitably falls for Catherine.
Catherine’s mission to Bath is to accompany the Allens during their stay in the city with shopping one of the activities planned.
Having settled in their lodgings in Pulteney Street Mrs Allen and Catherine head for Milsom Street and Bond Street where ‘one can step out of doors and get a thing in five minutes’.
In an encounter with Henry Tilney, he and Mrs Allen discuss the merits of the muslin that Catherine has bought from one of Bath’s retailers. She remarks: “Bath is a charming place, sir; there are so many good shops here.”
Another centre of socialising was the Pump Room where taking the waters was all part of the visit.
After a visit to Bath Abbey we learn: “As soon as the divine service was over, the Thorpes and the Allens eagerly joined each other; and after staying long enough in the Pump-room to discover that the crowd was insupportable, and that there was not a genteel face to be seen, which everybody discovers every Sunday throughout the season, they hastened away to the Crescent.”
Ah, the Crescent, that perennial backdrop to not only the film and TV versions of Jane Austen’s novels but to films like The Duchess with Keira Knightley, or Vanity Fair, with Reese Witherspoon as Becky Sharp.
Number One The Royal Crescent is a museum complete with rooms restored to how they would have been furnished in Catherine’s time in Bath. Suffice to say as a member of the middle classes she would have been spared the grime and hard labour of that of the servants who emptied the chamber pots, cooked the meals and cleaned the lodgings.
There’s plenty more on the author herself and her family in the Jane Austen Centre in Gay Street, while the Fashion Museum has examples of what the Tilneys and their set would have worn.
And there are regular guided walks visiting the places mentioned in Northanger Abbey where hopefully you won’t bump into any snobs like the Thorpes.

• The novel remains in print and is available from all good book shops in Bath.
• The Jane Austen Festival in Bath runs from Friday 9th to Sunday 18th September 2022. For details visit www.janeaustenfestivalbath.co.uk/

For more on Bath visit http://www.harrymottram.co.uk/bath-voice/bath-news/

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More news of Bath’s chic community in Bath Voice magazine – now out – or read online at https://issuu.com/bathvoice

Bath Voice Theatre Review: From the first performance of a play in Australia to Laurence Olivier in  the NT’s ‘63 production, George Farquhar’s The Recruiting Officer still packs them in – even in a field in Somerset

The Recruiting Officer: Captain Brazen and Captain Plume about to cross swords

Theatre Review: The Recruiting Officer. School Fields, Badgworth, Somerset

Convicts in Australia regained their self-esteem by acting in George Farquhar’s play about sex, Shrewsbury and soldiers, when the First Fleet arrived in Botany Bay, as The Recruiting Officer is a window into the cynical and nakedly humorous motives of men and women in search of love, status and money.

First produced in 1706 the Restoration Comedy is the story of officers using the recruitment of new soldiers as a chance for womanising and corruption. And the women they are after are just as wily as the uniformed protagonists. The drama hinges on misunderstandings, cross-dressing and cynical attempts to get rich through marriage with true love triumphing in the end.

Rose with her basket of chicken in The Recruiting Officer

Rain and Shine’s production mixes high comedy with Anthony Young enjoying himself as Melinda’s comically opportunist maid and the wonderfully foppish Rob Keeves as Captain Brazen with authentic power dressing costumes and military accessories.

With just seven in the cast director Jonathan Legg made good use of the entrances and exits, and 18th century outfits and wigs to define the stock characters. Emily Morozow was excellent value as the rich heiress Melinda and was equally committed to playing the haughty wench Rose, managing to inject a spicy venom into her character’s lines and body language.

Left: Anthony Young as an unlikely maid

Ian Alldis as the towering NCO Sergeant Kite barked his orders with military grade decibels while the versatile John Cooper-Evans played three roles as Thomas Appletree, Mr Worthy and Valentine Steward, defining each part with clarity.

Pippa Meekings had the most fun as the heroine Sylvia Balance who is enthralled with the handsome Captain Plume played by the dashingly good-looking Ashley Shiers by donning a moustache and breeches and returning as Jack Wilful. A handsome couple indeed.

Recruiting under way

Written more than a century after Shakespeare’s heyday The Recruiting Officer has remained a popular comedy despite the two-dimensional characters and complex plotting. It’s core theme of seeking a better life through hitching up with someone of a higher status due to their wealth and good looks is as universal as the competing contestants in ITV’s Love Island or Netflix’s Too Hot to Handle.

Pippa Meekings as Sylvia

The public’s appetite for handsome men in uniform, glamorous women, class, romantic rivalry and love triangles remains as strong today in Badgworth’s School Gardens as it did in the National Theatre’s 1963 production with Laurence Olivier as Brazen and in Botany Bay in 1787 when the transported convicts re-discovered their humanity in performing theatre.

Harry Mottram

The play is on tour until September in outdoor venues across England this summer with dates near to Bath in Gloucestershire and Wiltshire. For a full list, tickets and information visit http://www.rainorshine.co.uk/index.html

Harry Mottram is the news editor of Bath Voice monthly magazine covers news, views, reviews, previews and features as well as what’s on in Bath and events for residents in Bear Flat, Widcombe and Oldfield Park and the wider Bath area. Delivered door to door in south Bath and available in shops and supermarkets. See the Facebook site for details.

More news of Bath’s chic community in Bath Voice magazine – now out – or read online at https://issuu.com/bathvoice

For details for the work of the journalist Harry Mottram visit www.harrymottram.co.uk and follow him on all social media sites.

See:  https://www.facebook.com/bathvoice)
(https://twitter.com/bath_voice)

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/harry-mottram-a3613920/detail/recent-activity/
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ICSM BUSINESS INSOLVENCY NEWS: Ex-Newcastle United and Liverpool footballer Danny Guthrie hit by bankruptcy restrictions over financial irregularities

Generated by IJG JPEG Library

The one-time professional footballer Danny Guthrie has fallen foul of the Insolvency Service when they tackled him over his debts to creditors.

The service reported that in May 2019, Guthrie borrowed £75,000 from a friend to help him pay his household expenses, promising to repay the loan with funds raised from selling a property.

Incredibly he then blew £120,000 on gambling and chose to pay of those debts first from £160,000 he received from the sale of a property ignoring a string of creditors who needed to be paid. Taking cash out of his bank knowing he was insolvent was what tripped him with the Insolvency Service.

He accepted a six-year bankruptcy undertaking, at Stoke County Court, which runs until May 2028. The service placed on him several restrictions, banning him from borrowing more than £500 without giving details of his finances to a lender and restricting his ability to be a company director.

Kevin Read, Official Receiver at the Insolvency Service, said: “Danny Guthrie’s actions were deliberate in dissipating assets, at a time he was already insolvent, and to the loss of his creditors. This extension of bankruptcy restrictions should serve as a warning that the Insolvency Service will take action to tackle such financial wrongdoing.”

Guthrie played for Newcastle, Liverpool,  Southampton, Fulham, Walsall, Mitra Kukar in Indonesia and Icelandic second tier team Fram.

About ICSM Credit

ICSM Credit has more than four decades of experience as a credit intelligence group whose members gain inside information about firms in trouble allowing them to avoid bad debts and rogue traders. To join costs less than a tank of fuel – while at the moment there’s a special free temporary membership offer during the Covid-19 crisis which gives access to free legal letters. ICSM also has an effective debt collecting service which has a global reach – ask for details from Paul.

For details about ICSM Credit call 0844 854 1850 or visit the website www.icsmcredit.com or email Ian at Ian.carrotte@icsmcredit.com on how to subscribe and to join the UK’s credit intelligence network to avoid bad debts and late payers. Follow ICSM Credit on FaceBook, Twitter and YouTube and Ian Carrotte on LinkedIn.

To keep up to date subscribe to the FREE ICSM Credit Newsletter to hear all the latest insolvency news and to see who has gone out of business click on the orange panel on the top left of the home page of the website www.icsmcredit.com or send an email to Ian.carrotte@icsmcredit.com

For details for the work of the journalist Harry Mottram visit www.harrymottram.co.uk

BATH VOICE SPORTS OPINION: Bath Rugby: what’s being said about what went wrong this season – compared to the glory days when Bath were triumphant

The photograph will bring back memories for many a rugby fan – and is in contrast to the current predicament of Bath Rugby Club. That aside the club has a long and illustrious history and there have been other ups and downs – not just the ones of the glory days or today’s situation.
In the early days the team didn’t have a regular ground playing at Claverton Down, Lambridge Meadows, Taylor’s Field and Henrietta Park.
And in the war the team lost 17 players in the service of their country and the Rec was hit by German bombs. So there have been many more dark days in the club’s past – as well as the successes as shown in the photo above.

By Harry Mottram: Even the loyalist fans of Bath Rugby accept the 2021-2022 season has been one of the worst in terms for results in the club’s history.
The heavy defeats to Gloucester seemed to sum up everything that had gone wrong – and an experience that is so in contrast to the glory days of the 80s and 90s.
Everyone at the club and who follows the team’s fortunes have their own take on what has happened and how to turn things around, so it’s interesting to see what people have been saying.
In The Guardian last month Andy Bull wrote about questions raised over the director of rugby, Stuart Hooper, and “whether he was under-qualified for the job.”
And he said that owner Bruce Craig, “has had a reputation for meddling in selection and with signings, but who has now decided to step down as chairman and let Griffiths take over.” He also picked up on the training base at Farleigh House, which he said had been criticised as to whether it was suitable.
Liam Heagney for Ruby Pass quoted ex-Scotland lock Jim Hamilton as saying about Hooper: “I am going to say it frankly and I feel awful saying it because it is easy to judge and say you would be doing this, you should be doing that – Bath need to get rid of Hooper, they do.”
Following the latest defeat by the Cherries the media picked up on an apparent bust up between Bath’s Tom Dunn and Hooper in which Dunn appeared to take the director of rugby to task with some expletives according to some.
After the 0-64 loss in Gloucester head coach Neal Hatley said the team was lacking confidence. In the first 20 minutes he felt (even with only 14 men) the team were ‘in a contest’ but they didn’t do that for the last 60 minutes. Hatley also said there wasn’t a single player who wasn’t trying hard when questioned over the team’s collective desire to win.
Unsurprisingly criticism has come from the fans with many venting their fury on social media.
Many have put the blame on Hooper and Hatley and suggested that relegation to the Championship would help to refocus the club – although thankfully that won’t happen this season despite the club sitting at the bottom of the table.
The fact there is no relegation this season has for some been one reason why the club faded in the Gloucester game as failure didn’t have a consequence.
To turn things around the club have announced that England international Piers Francis will join the club from Northampton Saints while Dave Attwood will rejoin from Bristol Bears along with more signings to be announced.
And for some supporters the ongoing concerns about the Rec itself is a factor in the slump.
Back in the glory days Bath was on a par with their rivals – essentially the inheritors of the amateur status when many clubs played their rugby on local authority owned grounds and finances were on a far humbler level.
When professionalism arrived initially Bath were fine as insiders will tell you they were semi professional in terms of players receiving remuneration when they were supposed to be amateurs.
However clubs such as Exeter built new stadiums with new income streams from hospitality or moved to ground share like Bristol and Wasps.
So the issue of the stadium does have an effect on the club’s finances as it limits capacity and obviously the club can’t expand their offering with a hotel and more hospitality.
With a three year extension for the temporary stands there’s a breathing space – but the arguments rumble on. Lambridge would have been a possible site for a new ground but it’s a long walk up London Road and the attraction of the Rec is the central location.
One thing is for sure and that’s the loyalty of the fans – one of the few absolute pillars that hold up the club and maintain its high status.
At the time of going to press it is hard to know how things will pan out at the club this month and during the summer but one thing is for certain and that is that confidence must return and that will only happen with victories.

Bath Voice: Sport in June

Netball: Team Bath will hopefully be in the knock out stages of the Vitality Superleague competition this month which take place on the 3rd of June with the final on Sunday 5th June at the Copper Box Arena.
Netball 2: The Royal High School is host to a thriving netball league on Wednesday evenings – ideal for beginners as well as those of a higher standard. See https://www.play-netball.co.uk/bath/ for details of how to take part.
Cricket 1: Bath Bear Flat Cricket Club play at the Glasshouse Playing Fields. Established in 1982, the Club played friendly matches during that first season and having joined the North Somerset Cricket League in the autumn of 1982 the Club first played league matches in 1983.
Bear Flat CC also known as “The Bears” play in Division 1 of the Wiltshire County Cricket League on Saturdays; in Division 7 Blue of the Somerset Monmouth League on Saturdays; friendlies against clubs based in Somerset/Wiltshire on Sundays; T20 games against clubs based in Somerset/Wiltshire midweek; and participation in the Somerset Knock Out cup.
On Saturday 4 June the 1st XI play at home against Swindon Nalgo with another home fixture on June 18th when they entertain Marlborough. Away games in June are Purton on the 11th and Avebury on the 25th.
Cricket 2: Bath Cricket Club play at North Parade Bridge Road with their First XI taking on Thornbury on Saturday, June 11 in the West of England Premier League (WEPL), having played Potterne away the week before. They then face Bedminster at North Parade on Saturday 25th June with an away game up the hill at Lansdown on the 18th.
In April the 1st XI won all their friendlies so a good omen for another successful season. The club also features a second, third and fourth eleven, as well as two teams of Wanderers plus there is number of youth teams for boys and girls and a women’s XI. To join visit www.bathcricket.com
Cricket 3: Somerset County Cricket. Many in Bath remain loyal to Somerset when the city was fully part of the county.
The County Championship returns to a two-division structure with the opening seven rounds of the County Championship played from Thursday to Sunday on successive weeks during June and July with the final round in September. Somerset are in Division one and play Surrey on Sunday 12 June in the only county match in the championship in June.
In the Vitality Blast competition they play Sussex in Taunton on June 1, and Glamorgan on June 3. They travel to Nevil Road in Bristol on the 9th to play Gloucestershire and play a return fixture in Taunton on the 17th June. There’s more Vitality Blast action for the team when they play Essex away on the 19th and travel to the Oval to play Surrey on the 21st. Then it’s back to Taunton for Hampshire on the 23rd before away games against Glamorgan on the 24th and Middlesex on the 1st of July. The final match in the competition is on July 3rd back in Taunton when they will know if they will progress further.
The T20 Blast, currently named the Vitality Blast for sponsorship reasons is a professional Twenty20 cricket competition for English and Welsh first-class counties. The competition was established by the England and Wales Cricket Board in 2003 as the first professional Twenty20 league in the world.
Tennis: Bloomfield Tennis Club was founded in 1927 and is located at 98 Wellsway, Bath. The club welcomes new members. To join visit https://clubspark.lta.org.uk/BloomfieldTennisClub
Tennis 2: Bath Tennis Club is at
Park Lane, Weston, and bills itself at a friendly club. The club has a number of membership categories ranging from pay as you go to full membership at £275 for the year. For details visit www.bathtc.co.uk
Swimming: Bath Sports and Leisure Centre at North Parade features a 25 metre pool and a new teaching pool for beginners.
Cycling: Bath Cycle Club have various Club Runs for all levels of fitness.
They also have members who compete in local National B, Regional A and Regional B races, with several 2nd Cat, 3rd Cats, new and upcoming 4th Cat riders.
They are blessed with the many local criterium races with the purpose built circuit at Odd Down in Bath as well as weekly races at Castle Combe, Thruxton, and at Maindy – it is possible to race 2 or 3 times a week through the season.
New members welcome – of all abilities. Visit bathcc.net for details.