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Tag: harry mottram

STRAWBERRY LINE TIMES Feature: back in the day – the landlords and landladies of some of Bridgwater’s most celebrated pubs

STRAWBERRY LINE TIMES Feature: back in the day – the landlords and landladies of some of Bridgwater’s most celebrated pubs

Looking back: memories of the Mariners’ Arms in Bridgwater. A feature written By Harry Mottram for the Bridgwater Mercury in April 2016. THE series of stories about the pubs of Bridgwater Band district inspired by the researcher Jane Penfold has prompted Trevor Crook to write in with memories of the Mariners’ Arms in Northgate, Bridgwater. He writes: “It […]

By December 31, 2019 Read More →
RAPSCALLION MAGAZINE Book Review: no sex scenes in Donna Tartt’s coming of age novel about a boy’s lies, deceit and art world crimes – but plenty on his teenage drug taking

RAPSCALLION MAGAZINE Book Review: no sex scenes in Donna Tartt’s coming of age novel about a boy’s lies, deceit and art world crimes – but plenty on his teenage drug taking

The Goldfinch, by Donna Tartt Can a woman write a fictional biography about a teenage boy? Well, yes and no. Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch hits some of the right notes such as youthful dishonesty, amoral behaviour, deceitfulness and lies plus a fondness for alcohol and drugs in Theodore Decker’s retrospective narration. Strangely she skirts around […]

By October 27, 2019 Read More →
RAPSCALLION MAGAZINE Theatre Review: The Odyssey gets the Living Spit treatment – and this time it’s Odysseus’ wife Penelope who takes centre stage in a brilliant musical comic re-imagining of the Ancient Greek saga

RAPSCALLION MAGAZINE Theatre Review: The Odyssey gets the Living Spit treatment – and this time it’s Odysseus’ wife Penelope who takes centre stage in a brilliant musical comic re-imagining of the Ancient Greek saga

Review: The Odyssey. Salisbury Arts Centre Knob jokes,  comedy props and sensational singing make Living Spit’s version of Odysseus’ chronically badly navigated return from Troy a joy to experience. Homer’s Odyssey composed some 3,000 years ago of more than 12,000 lines of poetry is enjoyably reduced down to earthy Anglo Saxon phrases in this send […]

By October 26, 2019 Read More →
RAPSCALLION MAGAZINE: Theatre Review: much ado about a lot in Elizabeth Freestone’s refreshingly funny contemporary take on Shakespeare’s famous battle of wits between the sexes with Beatrice and Benedick’s enjoyable verbal sparring

RAPSCALLION MAGAZINE: Theatre Review: much ado about a lot in Elizabeth Freestone’s refreshingly funny contemporary take on Shakespeare’s famous battle of wits between the sexes with Beatrice and Benedick’s enjoyable verbal sparring

Much Ado About Nothing. Tobacco Factory, Bristol. Soldiers, snogging and songs mark Much Ado About Nothing as a youthful and vibrant show at the Factory Theatre in Bristol. A dramatic wartime opening sees Don Jon stripped of his rank and Claudio decorated for bravery helping to explain the motives behind Don Jon’s plan to wreck […]

By October 18, 2019 Read More →
Cheddar Reservoir: recent photographs of the magical scene at dawn in July as the waters greet the new day under the shadow of the Mendip Hills

Cheddar Reservoir: recent photographs of the magical scene at dawn in July as the waters greet the new day under the shadow of the Mendip Hills

Summer dawns on Somerset’s large strawberry shaped reservoir between Axbridge and Cheddar are often glorious affairs. Golden sunrises at around 5am are a particular feast as the 1930s reservoir acts as a mirror to the sky. Here a few images of the last few days in July 2019.

By August 2, 2019 Read More →
Children’s Theatre Review: More 21st century girl power than 1950s jolly hockey sticks in Emma Rice’s version of Enid Blyton’s Malory Towers in this highly enjoyable family show

Children’s Theatre Review: More 21st century girl power than 1950s jolly hockey sticks in Emma Rice’s version of Enid Blyton’s Malory Towers in this highly enjoyable family show

Malory Towers, Bristol. Review. Pack your suitcase, grab your hockey stick and take the train from the Passenger Shed at Bristol’s Temple Mead railway station for Malory Towers this summer writes Harry Mottram. The cavernous building is the venue for a production of the boarding school adventures inspired and abridged from Enid Blyton’s novels. Bursting […]

By July 26, 2019 Read More →
RAPSCALLION MAGAZINE BOOK REVIEW: How it all went wrong for the Labour Party in John O’Farrell’s reflections of the last 20 years of British politics (with wit, wisdom and a few political blind spots)

RAPSCALLION MAGAZINE BOOK REVIEW: How it all went wrong for the Labour Party in John O’Farrell’s reflections of the last 20 years of British politics (with wit, wisdom and a few political blind spots)

Things Can Only Get Worse?, by John O’Farrell No wonder John O’Farrell found it so hard to like Jeremy Corbyn in his book Things Can Only Get Worse?, because unlike his chums Gordon Brown and Tony Blair, Corbyn is a real socialist. O’Farrell’s light weight left wing credentials are exposed by the way he so […]

By April 14, 2019 Read More →
Rapscallion Magazine, Theatre Review: Crimes on the Nile – hyper fast who-dunnit spoof that is almost too fast at times

Rapscallion Magazine, Theatre Review: Crimes on the Nile – hyper fast who-dunnit spoof that is almost too fast at times

Crimes on the Nile. Tacchi Morris, Taunton New Old Friends have created a new comedy genre of a hyper fast moving send up of the period whodunit with their improvised style and joke laced script. The movement and choreography by Gary Sefton is excellent and the quartet of actors’ performances are brilliant in the way […]

By March 2, 2019 Read More →
Rapscallion Magazine. Issue number 7. February, 2019

Rapscallion Magazine. Issue number 7. February, 2019

A bit late I know – but here it is!

By February 24, 2019 Read More →
Rapscallion Magazine BOOK REVIEW: despite the decades Peter Brook’s The Empty Space contains many thought provoking ideas – although much of the text seems lost in the distant haze of the 1960s

Rapscallion Magazine BOOK REVIEW: despite the decades Peter Brook’s The Empty Space contains many thought provoking ideas – although much of the text seems lost in the distant haze of the 1960s

The Empty Space by Peter Brook In 150 odd pages Peter Brook spells out his thoughts on four types of theatre: the deadly, the holy, the rough and the immediate. He could easily have done it in 50 pages such is the density of his thought process. His essential theme is that theatre should be […]

By October 21, 2018 Read More →
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